DIFFICULT CONVERSATIONS WORKBOOK:
Finding A Path Through Illness


There’s no right or wrong way to cope with a treatable but incurable illness. But clear communication about needs and concerns is critical to helping you, the patient, secure both appropriate medical care and emotional support. The Difficult Conversations Workbook uses video of fellow patients’ reflections as a framework for guided writing exercises designed to help you identify and communicate your hopes and goals for treatment and beyond.
COMMUNITY EDUCATION PROGRAMS

Our “paradigm changing” programs educate communities about the patient’s role in opening difficult and meaningful conversations with family and healthcare providers. Learn More

A MEDICAL HUMANIST'S NOTES
Celia Engel Bandman
ASKING FOR WHAT YOU NEED…   
May 17, 2017 at 1:32 pm · Filed under communication, family & friends, healthcare professionals
When I was first diagnosed,” she said, “I didn’t feel I needed your help. I know how to get what I need—I’m a nurse, we speak the same language.” ...
WHAT IS A ‘GOOD PATIENT’?
April 26, 2017 at 11:28 am · Filed under family & friends, healthcare professionals, Patients

  “Variability is the law of life...no two bodies are alike, no two individuals react and behave alike under the conditions which we know as disease.” - William Osler, MD

In my previous blog I noted, “patients’ want to be good patients,” which prompted several people to ask, “What is a good patient?”  ...
“GOOD COMMUNICATION IS GOOD MEDICINE” ™
BREAKING NEWS

CCM founders Dr. Bernard Bandman and Celia Engel Bandman will partner with Stanford Medicine Palliative Care on a SpeakSooner Community Education Program, “Illness Does Not Just Impact One Person: We’re Stronger Together – Getting Patients, Families and Doctors on the Same Page”. Tuesday, June 13 at 5:30 pm at Stanford Health Library, Palo Alto, CA. This will be Stanford Palliative Care’s first community education program. A panel of experts will discuss challenges of healthcare communication and how to become an active partner in decisions about care. To learn more and make a reservation click HERE .

The most important questions don't seem to have ready answers. But the questions themselves have a healing power once they are shared.
Rachel Naomi Remen, MD
Kitchen Table Wisdom